Message from Tanya Denckla Cobb

You may remember from my first post that I attribute the idea for starting the GardenWorks project to Tanya Denckla Cobb's book, Reclaiming Our Food. A few months ago, I wrote Ms. Cobb to let her know how inspired I was by the stories of grassroots change in food production and distribution, and she quickly wrote back to thank me. Recently, she wrote about my note on her blog: 

It’s a rare privilege for a writer to learn that a book has changed someone’s life. Over the years, I’ve received everything from profuse thanks to cranky complaints about my books. Most anyone who takes the time to write an author is usually doing it because they were moved in some way.

For example, the few complaints I’ve received are usually something like: “Love your gardening book, but why didn’t you include artichokes?!” or “I can’t believe you didn’t include rhubarb! How can you consider yourself a real gardener if you don’t grow rhubarb!” Yes, I welcome even these complaints, because now I know what to include in my next edition.

Still, opening email originating from my website always carries a little fear factor.

So I was blown away when I received a note from Tina Koral, founder of GardenWorks DuPage. She said Reclaiming Our Food had changed her life, and led her to start her own community garden project to address hunger. Here is her testimony on my Amazon page:

”This may sound silly or far-fetched, but this book really did change my life. I came upon it by accident at my local library at a time when I was looking to do some volunteering, and wanted to include my husband and two kids so that they can learn the value of helping others and philanthropy. I read the first chapter about the groups who grow gardens for people in need, and was immediately inspired to do the same. We teamed up with our local food pantry to identify families to donate raised bed gardens to. Just a few weeks ago, we finished the building stage, and now four families have new gardens with plants that they requested, along with a volunteer mentor to guide them through the growing season. And my family feels good about helping a family in need.
“Anyone who has an interest in the local food movement should read this book. The stories are so interesting, with lots of resources to follow through with any project you have in mind or might want to support. And even if you have no plans on creating or joining a food project, it’s still a very interesting read.

Tina is the kind of person who inspired me to write Reclaiming Our Food! She’s what this grassroots food movement is all about: local people using local food to help their neighbor, build their community.

Thanks for the shout-out, Tanya! Check out Tanya Denckla Cobb's blog here.

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